Ginopedia

Gin Producers

Plymouth Gin

Soon after Coates & Co began in 1793, Plymouth Gin became a firm favourite in the numerous countries it was shipped to. The gin drinking of the Royal Navy considerably enhanced gin’s prestige as it climbed the ladder of respectability in Victorian times. By 1850 Coates & Co were supplying over 1000 barrels of ‘navy strength’ 57% abv gin a year to the Royal Navy.

They were fond of mixing it with Angostura bitters or lime for ‘medicinal’ purposes. Thanks to the British Royal Navy taking it on ships all over the world, it was to become the world’s largest volume brand of gin with 1000 cases a week going to New York alone by the 1900’s.

In 1896 the first ever recipe for a Dry Martini specified Plymouth Gin (in Stuart’s Fancy Drinks and How to Mix Them) and by the 1930’s Plymouth Gin was the star of the cocktail era. It is the only gin still around today to be named in numerous recipes in the renowned Savoy Cocktail Book – still the bible of mixology.

Established:1793
Address:Black Friars Distillery,
60 Southside Street,
The Barbican,
Plymouth
PL1 2LQ
Telephone:01752 665 292
Website:http://plymouthgin.com/

Plymouth Gin Brands:

Plymouth Original Dry Gin

Plymouth London Dry Gin

Plymouth Gin continues to be made according to the original artisanal method and recipe on the same historic site. The gin is batch-made using a single copper pot-still originally installed in the distillery during the Victorian era in 1855, represented by the copper cap on every bottle of Plymouth. Its artisanal production methods, complex flavour profile and smooth texture have ensured that Plymouth gin is often regarded as the ‘single malt of gins’. The combination of slightly sweeter botanicals and soft Dartmoor water has made it the gin of choice for connoisseurs and bartenders. The first ever recipe for the Dry Martini was published in 1896 in “Stuarts Fancy Drinks” and the recipe specified Plymouth gin. By the height of the cocktail era, Plymouth gin was regularly referenced as the gin of choice, particularly within the revered “Savoy Cocktail Book” where it is listed more than any other gin.

Plymouth Navy Strength

When gunpowder goes bang, the ’proof’ of the alcohol strength is at least 100 proof (114 US proof) or 57% alcohol by volume. Therefore, gunpowder was used as the test for ’proving’ there was the expected level of alcohol in the clear liquid. Plymouth Gin Navy Strength first went to sea in 1793 with the Royal Navy. The Royal Navy Supply Offices ’Pussers’ needed to check what they were buying was what they had ordered. For some it is the ultimate gin, with a rich but balanced taste that takes a Martini or a Gin and Tonic to a new level, perfect for the demands of today's more adventurous spirit drinkers and mixologists. The 57% ABV amplifies the aroma and fragrance of the botanicals, yet retains the smooth and balanced character Plymouth gin is renowned for.

Plymouth Sloe gin

A eureka moment came when it was discovered that by soaking Blackthorn fruit in gin and adding sugar, a very agreeable drink was produced: Sloe Gin was born! Plymouth Sloe Gin is based on an 1883 recipe and has since become an important part in various classic cocktails, notably the Sloe Gin fizz. Sloe berries are slowly and gently steeped in Plymouth gin, soft pure Dartmoor water and a small amount of sugar for approximately four months. The sugar levels are kept low to allow the full flavour of the berries to shine and allow the dry acidity of the fruit to be an important part of the taste. The result is an entirely natural product with no added flavourings or colourings. Sloe Gin has a rich red colour, which is the result of the steeping process. The result is a smooth liqueur taste with a beautiful balance between sweet and bitter fruit flavours, plus a hint of almonds from the stone of the fruit. Awards for this gin: 2003 Gold – International Wine and Spirits Competition 2005 Gold – Taste of the West Product Awards

Further information:

Plymouth Gin Distillery

The building dates back to the early 1400s, with the most intact part of the distillery, the Refectory Room - a medieval hall with a fine hull-shaped timber roof built in 1431, being one of the oldest buildings in Plymouth. It is thus protected as a national monument and is one of the city's most precious heritages. The Distillery was once a monastery inhabited by the Black Friars. In 1536, at the time of the Reformation and dissolution of the monasteries, the former home of the Black Friars was put to a variety of other uses, including being the town's Marshalsea or debtor's prison. It was also the first Non-Conformist meeting place and a billet for Huguenot refugees who fled France for Plymouth. The Pilgrim Fathers even spent their last night in England here in 1620. It was from the distillery that they made the short walk down to the harbour to set sail on the Mayflower on their epic voyage to start a new life in America, where they founded a new Plymouth. The Mayflower ship forms Plymouth Gin's trademark label today. Black Friars is indisputably the oldest working gin distillery with records of a 'mault-house' on the premises…